What: Charge Lime scooters for pay

Expected pay: $5 – $20 per scooter collected, charged and returned

Husl$core: $$$

Commissions & Fees: NA

Where: Most major U.S. cities and a handful of college campuses. Full list here

Requirements: Be over the age of 18; live in an area where Lime operates scooters; have a way to collect and deliver scooters (usually requires a car or truck); smart phone

Review: Lime operates almost identically to Bird. If you want to become a “juicer,” you sign up and download the company’s app, which will tell you where to find scooters that need charging. You can pick up the ones that are almost out of juice at any time; and can collect other available scooters after 9 p.m. They must be delivered (or in Lime parlance, “served”) by 7 a.m. — just like Bird. Also like Bird, it typically takes 4 – 6 hours to fully charge a scooter, so you generally pick them up in the evening and drop them off before you go to work in the morning. 

Unlike Bird that gives you chargers when they accept your application, you have to buy the Lime chargers for about $20 per four-pack. Several chargers — including the San Diego YouTube guy linked below — note that the Lime scooters are often not where they say they are on the app. That can cause you to waste both time and money chasing around illusive scooters. The combination of the $20 cost to get a package of chargers and the complaints about missing scooters lands Lime a mere average Husl$core vs. Bird’s better-than-average.

But there’s nothing stopping you from signing up to charge both types of scooters — as well as Spin scooters, if they’re all available in your city. If you’ve got enough electric outlets in your house and a car big enough to pick up multiple scooters at a time, the best way to make real money with this side hustle is to charge for everyone — Lime, Bird and Spin. 

What their juicers say:

This San Diego-based YouTuber charges both Lime and Bird scooters (advisable) and says he earns between $100 and $200 a day. His tips here.

Try Lime