Arise bills itself as a way that customer service professionals can work for themselves, on their own schedules. But requires them to pay for training and for monthly access to a buggy technology system.

Expected pay: speculative

Husl$core: $

Commissions & fees: $50-$250 to start (for training), plus $40 per month

Where: U.S., UK and Canada

Requirements: Business license, Training, high-speed internet, computer and headset

Arise Review

Arise purports to connect independent businesses that provide customer service with companies that need customer service representatives. They require that freelancers signing up for their platform have a business license and taxpayer i.d. to establish that Airse is a business-to-business provider.

In reality, the site acts like any other customer service job conduit — only worse. (See our reviews of WorkingSolutions and LiveOps). Freelance “business owners” sign up. And then they choose which of the companies needing customer service help they’d like to work for. Each of these companies has required training. However, you are not paid to be trained here. Indeed, you are charged $50 to $250 for the training. And Arise also charges you $40 per month to have access to the site’s technology platform.

Users maintain that this technology platform is buggy and can force customer service representatives to spend hours on the phone with Arise’s platform support people. Customer service representatives are generally paid by the productive minute when working for a client, so the hours spent on Arise technology take money out of the “business owner’s” pocket.

Recommendations

Avoid this platform. You can find far better customer service work with WorkingSolutions and LiveOps. And neither platform will force you to pay them for training. Or better yet, find an customer service job with a company that pays decently and wants to hire you as an employee. (See our blog post on remote customer service jobs.)

Want to work with Arise anyway?

Here’s a direct link to their site.

What their users say (from Glassdoor)

“Unpaid training, low wages, no overtime. Technical support is a joke.”

“Want hours? Your hours are broken down into 20 minute intervals, which you sign up for. You might work an hour at 7am and 20 minutes at 330pm and 20 at 445pm and an hour at 11pm. How is that for “freedom?” And I could go on.”

“Pay too low for the amount of extra training after hours you need to put in. Available hours are usually the ones no one wants when you’re a newbie.”

Pay for required training

“It gives you multiple opportunities. But you have to pay to work.”

“They make you pay for your own training then tell you whether or not you’re good enough to work for them after you’ve wasted 2-4 weeks of your time and money. They found a loop hole to skirt around paying individuals while they train then make it mandatory to attend everyday. Pay structure and QA metric is beyond questionable. So don’t expect to always make the hourly rate they advertise.”

“You usually pay for your own training which is ridiculous. The extra certifications I got offered provided little pay advancements but the calls were harder. I was paying forty a month for SERVICE fees for I’m guessing the Arise Secure Desktop. That constantly froze and booted you out.”

Tech nightmares

“More cons than I can list. Google Arise virtual solutions before you shovel out money to have more computer issues than you can handle in an 8 hour day. Or if you don’t want to be paid *Between* calls… because an 8 hour day can quickly change to a 5 hour day. Sitting on hold with tech support or sitting “in a chat room WAITING for tech support will cost you too.”

“Don’t even get me started on tech support and customer service. You lose hours of pay thanks to Arise systems and Arise doesn’t care in the slightest.”

“I have spent many days waiting 6 hours or more for tech support.”

“Lots of tech issues. When tech issues arise, hours are lost and so are the profits you could have gained. Potential loss of job if needing to be absent for real-world issues like health, family, and uncontrollable events.”

3/26/2022