If you love to pass on your vast knowledge of the culinary arts, there’s never been a better time to teach cooking classes. And there are three platforms that can help you find a paying audience uniquely interested in cooking. Those platforms:

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Tastemade

Tastemade is a lifestyle media company that enlists “makers” to offer cooking content, ranging from online classes to in-person events. Cooks set the menu, price, schedule and terms. And they can offer “fan subscriptions” here too. With a fan subscription, you can give avid followers merchandize discounts and access to special events and recipes for a price that you determine and that’s collected monthly by the site. And because Tastemade has millions of viewers, who are specifically looking for food and lifestyle content, this can be a great place to build an audience. Learn more about TasteMade here. 

Cozy Meal

CozyMeal connects chefs and caterers with people wanting to arrange private and corporate dinner parties and cooking classes. The site also books homes and other sites as venues for these events when neither the chef nor the client has the right space. Chefs determine what to make and/or offer, when, where, and how much to charge. CozyMeal takes a commission that varies based on group size. Learn more about CozyMeal here.

Eatwith

Eatwith launched with the idea that you could offer authentic dining experiences to travelers in your own home. However, like many other business that thrived on dining-out, the site revamped its offerings during the pandemic to allow for online cooking classes. Those online offerings can now be offered in person, too. So, a chef in Madrid might host an online event to teach the art of making Paella to viewers around the world. The next day, he could host Gazpacho lessons in his own home. Eatwith books clients and takes a commission on sales. Learn more about Eatwith here.

Or sign up for Eatwith here.

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