What: PrizeRebel pays you to take surveys, but the pay is slight. And the site can rescind your earnings if you run afoul of it’s rules.

Expected pay: $1-4 an hour (est.)

Husl$core: $

Commissions & fees: NA

Where: Nationwide

Requirements: 18 or older, or 16, with parental permission

Review:

Like many survey sites, PrizeRebel pays you to answer questions. The pay is in the form of points, which are worth about a penny a piece. You get about 50 points/cents for surveys that could take 10 to 20 minutes, so in a best-case scenario, you’ll earn a few bucks per hour.

This is pretty standard when dealing with online survey sites. On the bright side, surveys are one of the few jobs you can perform while watching t.v.  or waiting for a flight. There’s little effort involved.

Pay ripped away

However, what makes PrizeRebel worse than the average survey site is the plethora of ways it can deprive you from claiming even these pitiful wages. The site’s terms and conditions list nine different ways that users could end up having to forfeit their points, including one that basically says that the promised points “shall be determined by us at our sole discretion.”

Worse, site errors can cause you to not get credited for surveys that you’ve completed. This is a common complaint among users who’ve reviewed the site. We experienced the same problem when testing PrizeRebel. Specifically, after spending 18 minutes answering questions, we finally reached the end and…blank screen. There was no way to go back or get credited the promised 70 points. Our tester was also “disqualified” from other surveys, after spending more than 10 minutes feeding in personal information.

Recommendations

No survey site is going to be a big money-maker. But other sites at least pay what was promised. Survey Junkie, Swagbucks and Consumer Opinion Services are all better options, in our opinion.

If you like sharing your opinions, also consider signing up for focus group sites, such as FindFocusGroups, FieldWork and SignupDirect. Focus groups are not offered every day. When they are available, they take more time. However, they also pay considerably better — often $15 to $50 per hour.

What their users say (from SiteJabber)

“Prize Rebel is THE MOST FRUSTRATING survey site ever! First off, the ‘Daily Surveys’ have NEVER worked for me. They always go to a blank page or error page. Secondly, there are NO points for disqualification. It’s bad enough spending 10-15 minutes on a survey to be disqualified. But these tightwads can’ t even throw you a point for trying. Finally, even if you do manage to actually complete a survey, you may end up on an ‘error page’ and not get credited. That happens about 3 out of ten times.” 

“I have been using this site for a few months now and can make about $5 dollars per day, which should be $20 per day. But you get disqualified at the end of most of their surveys and won’t get the credit.” 

“Tried to redeem $45 today as a platinum member and they have magically put a hold on my account. No response to emails. Not impressed.”

Problem with this site is… You are forced to nickel and dime your way to cashing out because any offer completed over 500 points, or $5.00, Prize Rebel holds off paying you for your participation for 30 days apparently for ‘security’ reasons. No other site does this.

I’ve been doing prize rebel for a while. Suddenly they shut down my account and wanted me to send them a picture of my drivers license. I am not doing that. Goodbye for good. I will never recommend them or use them again.
I have had a very poor experience with this site. After almost a full week of constant survey errors and rejections I made a total of 77 points, equivalent to approximately 70 cents.

And this one (from TrustPilot) sums it up 

“The site sends you to third party survey sites. Fine. I was expecting that. But what they don’t tell you is that you will then enter the Twilight Zone of repeated questions, constantly being forwarded to new survey site after survey site, without ever once ever directing you back to the site you originally came from, or even telling you “thanks, but no thanks!” I just spent half an hour telling one survey “Yes, my kids like juice!” only to be taken to yet another survey site. Did I finish the juice survey? Who knows! Not a single point for my time.”
*12/2/2020